MAGAZINES

Here are some of our MAGAZINES available for purchase:

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Abraham Lincoln Association Papers Complete Run 1924-39 SIGNED
This is a complete run of the Abraham Lincoln Association Papers from Vol. 1 (1924) to Vol. 15 (1939), in fifteen annual bound volumes, many of them signed. Octavos. Hardbacks, with canvas spines and paper-covered boards. VG, scuffing. The Abraham Lincoln Association was formed in 1908 to spearhead the centennial celebration of Lincoln’s birth. It saw no reason to disband after the festivities and indeed continues today. In 1924 they launched their first publishing effort, an annual volume that printed the papers delivered before the association at its Lincoln birthday gathering each February. In those days, the Association was an intimate affair, made up of Lincoln scholars, descendents of Lincoln’s associates and friends, and Lincoln boosters. The set contains addresses on such topics as Lincoln’s legal practice, his relationship with Douglas, his plans for reunion (Nevins), his genius (Sandburg), his spirituality, his power with words (Angle), his humor (Thomas), his house, etc. This set is distinctive because many of the volumes are signed by participants, the most noteworthy being Lincoln scholars Benjamin Thomas (4 times), Paul Angle (2), and Harry Pratt (2), former Indiana senator and Lincoln biographer Albert Beveridge (1), Illinois governor Henry Horner (3), and president of the association Logan Hay, John Hay’s cousin. Beginning in 1940, the association commenced publishing the Abraham Lincoln Quarterly. $600

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American Advocate of Peace Pacifist Magazine Hartford CT 1834-36
This is a two-year run of eight quarterly issues of The American Advocate of Peace. Vol. 1, No. 1 (June 1834) to No. 8 (March 1836), bound by the publisher in brown patterned cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with sunning to spine. Contents near fine, with spotting. The American Advocate of Peace was an early entry in the literature of the American peace movement. Initially published for the Connecticut Peace Society by William Watson and edited by C. S. Henry, it was taken over at the commencement of its second year by the American Peace Society and edited by Francis Fellowes. It was an earnest effort, containing thoughtful essays on war, its causes and its effects, international law as a means to achieve peace, the philosophy of forgiveness, opposition to the death penalty, and reports from other peace societies, book reviews, and news. Fellowes began a volume 2, but published only three more issues before financial pressures ended the magazine. $200

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American Institute of Mining Engineers Transactions Bound Run 1871-75
This is a four-year run of the Transactions of the American Institute of Mining Engineers from Vol. 1 (May 1871 – February 1873) to Vol. 3 (May 1874 – February 1875), comprising the first four years bound in three volumes of black leather and marbled boards. Octavos. Bindings near fine. Contents near fine. The American Institute of Mining Engineers, founded in 1871 in Wilkes -Barre, PA, is one of the oldest technical professional societies in America. These volumes contain not only selected papers by members but also the rules of the Institute, a list of members, and minutes of all the early meetings. Papers included discussions of all aspects of extracting and processing metals, the geology and typography of mining, mechanical innovations, the business aspects of the industry, technological improvements, and more. The founding group consisted of 22 engineers. By 1875, there were hundreds. Today there are nearly one hundred and fifty thousand members. This is a valuable chronicle of the early days of an important scientific organization. $400

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Appleton’s Journal Magazine Winslow Homer American Views Bound 1869-70
This is a four-volume run of Appleton’s Journal, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (April 3, 1869) to Vol. 4, No. 92 (December 31, 1870), bound in contemporary half leather and marbled boards. Quartos. Bindings scuffed and bumped at tips, handsome, VG+; contents near fine, with a few marginal tears to foldouts. Some of the foldouts poorly folded in. Ghosting to the June 19, 1869, Homer cover. Appleton’s Journal ran for seven years as a weekly, but only the first two years of the magazine are heavily illustrated. These volumes contain twenty-five “cartoons,” the curious label Appleton’s applied to stand-alone illustrations that accompanied select issues. The most impressive of these are beautiful cityscapes and landscapes (“The Grand Drive at Central Park,” “Fairmount Park, Philadelphia,” “The Levee at New Orleans,” etc.), measuring up to 11″ high by 28″ long. Also featured are fourteen steel engravings of American locales, which inspired the famous two-volume work, Picturesque America, later in the decade. Winslow Homer contributed ten illustrations to these volumes (Beam #152-159, 176, 177), of which five are covers, one a tipped-in doublespread (“The Fishing Party”), and one a large fold-out (“On the Beach at Long Branch”[9 ½” X 13″]). The volumes also contain illustrated supplements devoted to specific subjects, such as “Underground Life; or Coal-Mines and Miners” and “New York Illustrated,” a profusely illustrated 16-page tour of the city. The first volume contains the first American excerpt of Jules Verne’s Journey to the Center of the Earth and the third and fourth volumes contain monthly installments of Charles Dickens’ Mystery of Edwin Drood. Mott says, “Few periodicals of the years following the Civil War furnished a better picture of the varied life of the times than the weekly Appleton’s Journal did from 1869 to 1876.” (Mott III/417). This is a nice set. $600

burtons1840Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine Edgar Allan Poe 1840
This is a bound volume of Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine Vol. 6, No. 1 (January 1840) through Vol. 7, No. 6 (December 1840), comprising the final eleven issues of Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine and the first issue of Graham’s Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Magazine (adopting the numbering of Burton’s), bound in brown calf leather and marbled boards. Octavo. Binding VG+, handsome. Contents near fine, clean and attractive. This volume contains five of the issues Poe edited (January to May 1840), all five installments of “The Journal of Julius Rodman,” the short stories “Peter Pendulum” and “The Man of the Crowd,” the two final installments of “Field Sports and Manly Pastimes,” all five installments of “Omniana,” all four installments of “A Chapter on Science and Art,” two essays, and 23 book and magazine reviews. William Burton was well known as an actor when he decided in 1837 to launch Burton’s Gentleman’s Magazine. Successful from the start, it featured much written by Burton himself, who was assisted by a corps of New York and Philadelphia scribblers. The mercurial Southern, Edgar Allan Poe, first wrote for the magazine in February 1839, became Burton’s co-editor with the July issue, and maintained his connection with the magazine nearly to its end. In all, he contributed 123 pieces, including his masterpiece of horror, “The Fall of the House of Usher,” and the distinguished five-part, “Journal of Julius Rodman.” Burton found working with Poe increasingly difficult and let him go in May 1840. Then he tired of the entire enterprise, selling out at the end of the year to George Graham, who combined Burton’s with the Casket to form Graham’s Ladies’ and Gentlemen’s Magazine, which had its debut in December 1840. For all of its popularity, Burton’s Magazine is scarce. This is the most attractive example that we have ever handled of this year. $1,200

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Butterfly Literary Quarterly George Wolfe Plank Complete Run 1907-09
This is a complete run of George Wolfe Plank’s Butterfly Quarterly, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (Autumn 1907) to Vol. 2, No. 3 (Summer 1909), comprising seven issues in original wrappers. Quartos and small folios. All issues VG or better, with chipping to wrapper overhangs and occasionally, to spines. The Butterfly Quarterly was the design work of 24-year-old George Wolfe Plank, who later became a leading cover artist for Vogue during its most beautiful years in the teens and twenties. Plank published the magazine along with Margaret Scott, Alice Smith, and Amy Smith from 1907 through 1909. Its content, featuring prose, poetry, and art, classifies it as a “little magazine” in the style of the Chap-Book of the 1890’s, but it was not little in format. Contributors included Sadakicki Hartmann, Gordon Craig (artwork), and a very young Louis Untermeyer (“A Portrait,” “Isadora Duncan Dancing” “The Dying Decadent” and an essay), but the star of the show was Plank, who contributed more than two dozen woodcuts and two dozen drawings. The art displayed his fluid talent, especially for bookplates, of which several are tipped in, and presaged his brilliant career. The Butterfly was strictly limited to 500 copies per issue; each copy is numbered. It is a notoriously fragile publication, so this run constitutes a better than average complete set. $750

christunionspines1850-62Christian Union / Christian World Missionary Magazine 1850-62
This is a thirteen year run of the American and Foreign Christian Union/ Christian World magazine, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1850) to Vol. 13, No. 12 (December 1862), comprising 156 issues, bound in twelve volumes of black leather and marbled boards. Bindings VG+, with notable edge wear to four volumes. Contents VG, with old water stains to four of the volumes. The American and Foreign Christian Union was formed in 1849 upon the merging of three complimentary missionary societies; the American Protestant Society, the Foreign Evangelical Society and the Christian Alliance. In 1850, to facilitate communication and publicize its good works, the Union began publishing a monthly magazine. It was a handsome production. Each issue sported an engraved portrait of a leading Christian light, past or present, and was full of missionary news. Union workers were indefatigable as only it seems missionaries can be, accosting the Portuguese immigrants in eastern seaports, Mexicans along the Rio Grande, German Catholics in the Midwest, Frenchies who had strayed over the border into New York from Quebec, as well as the entire populations of benighted countries like Ireland and Hayti (sic). Later it moved into the Sandwich Islands and the Pacific Rim nations. In an effort to better know what they were up against, a significant amount of space was devoted to the rites and rituals of Catholicism. By 1860, the AFCU was thriving, supported 73 workers in the U.S. and more than 200 abroad. This turned out to be the Union’s high-water mark as one denomination after another began establishing their own independent missions. Today, the Union continues but with horns pulled in. It supports three protestant churches in Catholic strongholds in Europe. $450

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Druggist Paint and Oil Review Pharmaceutical Magazine Vol. 2 1880
This is a complete year of the Druggist and Paint and Oil Review (it became simply The Druggist with the June issue), containing the January through December 1880 monthly issues, bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG with general rubbing. Contents VG with marginal staining. Title page and index bound in. Advertising pages bound in. Nice color Victoria, Illinois, druggist business label on front fly. $100

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Druggist Pharmaceutical Trade Magazine Vol. 3 1881
This is a complete year of the Druggist, containing the January through December 1881 monthly issues, bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG with general rubbing. Contents VG with marginal staining. Title page and index bound in. Advertising pages bound in. Nice color Victoria, Illinois, druggist business label on front fly. $100

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Druggist Pharmaceutical Trade Magazine Vol. 4 1882
This is a complete year of the Druggist, containing the January through December 1882 monthly issues, bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG with general rubbing. Contents VG with marginal staining. Title page and index bound in. Advertising pages bound in. Nice color Victoria, Illinois, druggist business label on front fly. $100

edureview1891-95The Educational Review Nicholas Murray Butler Columbia 1891-95
This is a five-year bound run of Nicholas Murray Butler’s Educational Review, Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1891) to Vol. 10, No. 5 (December 1895), comprising 50 numbers, bound in ten volumes. Bindings VG, with smudging to spine where library numbers used to be. The first nine are in the publisher’s terra cotta cloth binding, the tenth volume in green cloth. Contents VG, with library puncture stamps to some pages and pockets on rear paste-downs. The tenth volume has front covers bound in. All volumes indexed. The Educational Review, a monthly (not published in July and August), was founded by Nicholas Murray Butler and edited by him for the first thirty years of its long run (1891-1928). Butler was regarded as a twenty-four year old wunderkind when he was appointed to the philosophy department faculty at Columbia in 1885. His interest in how humans learn prompted him in 1887 to co-found, and become president of, the New York School for the Training of Teachers, which later affiliated with Columbia University and was renamed Teachers College, Columbia University. In 1891, the ever restless Butler founded the Educational Review to further promote his interest in the philosophy of education. He succeeded in attracting the best minds in education to its pages and it quickly became, in Mott’s words, “the leading scholarly journal in the field of general education.” Butler was so devoted to the journal that he continued to edit it long after he was appointed president of Columbia in 1902. This is the only run we have ever handled. $200

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Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine October 1923
This is the October 1923 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include Victor Black, J. C. Chadwick, Ethel Mayne, Norman Davey, John Austen Haydn Mackey, Louis Moreau, Grace Rogers, and others. $150

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Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine April 1924
This is the April 1924 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include L.A.G. Strong, Graham Green, John Austen, Haydn Mackey, Grace Rogers, Evelyn Waugh, and others. $150

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Golden Hind Quarterly Arts and Letters Magazine July 1924
This is the July 1924 issue of The Golden Hind, the great arts and literary quarterly published in London in the early 1920s. Small folio. Near fine. Contributors include L.A.G. Strong, Kathleen Freeman, Ethel Mayne, John Austen, Grace Rogers, Evelyn Waugh, and others. $150

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Grant Family Genealogy Magazine 1900-01 Complete Run Wrappers
This is a complete run of twelve issues of the Grant Family Magazine, devoted to Grant family genealogy, from February 1900 to December 1901, all published. Octavos. Wrappers near fine, last issue with spine repair. Contents near fine. A handsome nicely illustrated bi-monthly in the original wrappers. $100

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Harper’s Weekly Newspaper Magazine Nast Santa Election 1880
This is Volume 24 of Harper’s Weekly containing No. 1201 (January 3, 1880) to No. 1252 (December 25, 1880), comprising 52 issues, bound in black leather and brown cloth. Folio. Binding VG+, with scuffing and edge wear. Contents near fine. Doublespreads tipped in. Highlights include 1880 presidential campaign coverage, one hundred and twenty Thomas Nast cartoons, and full- and doublespread plates by AB Frost, Bernhard Gillam, and Howard Pyle. Harper’s Weekly is surely the most famous and probably the most important nineteenth century magazine. It is loaded with significant and beautiful woodcuts that chronicle all aspects of the life of the period. Initially, it was devoid of controversy or opinion; the publishers apparently didn’t want to alienate a single potential subscriber. But with the advent of the Civil War, the editorship of GW Curtis (1863-92), and the cartoons of Thomas Nast (1862-1886), Harper’s Weekly metamorphosed into one of the great journals of opinion, as well as being a distinguished source of news. Added to that are the many important contributors of graphics and prose, chief among them being Winslow Homer, A. Conan Doyle, Frederic Remington, H. G. Wells, and Maxfield Parrish, spread throughout the run from first to last. Mott sums up the value of the magazine this way: “The old files of Harper’s Weekly are a delight to the casual reader and a rich treasury for the historical investigator.” (Mott/II/469). $500

intrevspines1874-83The International Review Magazine Complete Run Henry Cabot Lodge 1874-83
This is a complete run of 14 volumes of The International Review, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1874) to Vol. 14 (June 1883), comprising 82 issues, bound in 14 volumes of cloth spines with leather spine labels and marble paper-covered boards. Octavos. Bindings near fine with small paper library labels to spines. Contents near fine with old library pockets on rear paste-downs. Despite the implication of its name, The International Review was primarily a critical review, like The North American Review, not a journal of politics. As such, its contributors included Henry James, Jr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, William Cullen Bryant, Oliver Wendell Holmes, John Greenleaf Whittier, Sydney Lanier, Brander Matthews, and, from abroad, Sir Edwin Arnold, P. G. Hamerton, and Justin McCarthy. Topics of interest included Deep Sea Exploration, Transcendentalism in New England, Reminiscences of Alexander Stephens, current controversies of the day, both political and academic, and profiles of Poe, Longfellow, and Bryant, among many. As Mott says, “The contents were varied, with good articles on literature and art, and some belle-lettres. Book reviews were given special attention.” Founded by John Leavitt as a bimonthly, it became a monthly publication when John Morse and Henry Cabot Lodge became editors in 1879. Robert Porter and William Balch were the final editors. A nice set of a distinguished though short-lived periodical. $300

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Henry James, Jr. / The Nation Magazine 180 issues featuring Henry James Jr. Contributions
This is a huge collection of issues of the Nation from Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 6, 1865) to Vol. 29, No. 735 (July 31, 1879), comprising 180 scattered issues in the original wrappers, each one featuring contributions by Henry James, Jr. Quartos. Generally VG to fine, occasional spotting, uncut, two with significant discoloration to front wrap, one with chip to upper margin. Housed in three matching vertical slipcases. This extraordinary collection of issues from the first fifteen years of The Nation, beginning with volume 1, number 1, features more than 200 contributions by Henry James, nearly his entire output for the magazine save for one essay he wrote in 1915 to mark the magazine’s fiftieth birthday. He would never again write so extensively for one publication. His contributions include travelogues of trips throughout Europe and North America, appraisals of other writers including Walt Whitman, Ivan Turgenev, Algernon Swinburne, and Thomas Carlyle, essays on such diverse subjects as “The Noble School of Fiction,” the National Gallery, the Jesuits of North America, and “The Afghan Difficulty,” book reviews of works by Charles Dickens, Victor Hugo, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Thomas Hardy, among many, and art and theater criticism. Only three issues containing James contributions are missing from this set and those contributions are supplied in facsimile. The Nation has been the weekly voice of the left for 150 years. It began by inheriting the mantle of William Lloyd Garrison’s anti-slavery paper, The Liberator, which had folded earlier that year. As such, it championed the rights of the Freedman and agitated for the “elevation of the Negro.” But it was more than a political weekly. In fact, it was probably the best critical review published in America up to that time. Mott says, “The list of the early contributors to The Nation enrolls most of the famous scholars and writers of the sixties and seventies.” (Mott/III/335) They included, in addition to James, his father and his brother, James Russell Lowell, William Dean Howells, Francis Parkman, John Fiske, Charles Francis Adams, and many other brilliant men not well-known today. This set is virtually impossible to assemble piecemeal. $750

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Journal of the American Medical Association AMA Bound Run 1883-87
This is a bound run of the Journal of the American Medical Association. Vol. 1, No. 1 (July 14, 1883) to Vol. 9, No. 27 (December 31, 1887), comprising 234 weekly issues, bound in nine volumes of matching black leather and marbled boards. Quartos. Bindings VG, with modest wear. Contents near fine. The venerable Journal of the American Medical Association, now referred to simply as JAMA, was founded in 1883 by the AMA and edited in its first five years by the great Doctor Nathan Smith Davis, Sr. (1817-1904). This run encompasses nearly all of the issues that he edited. Davis, born in upstate New York, became a doctor at the age of 20, and soon moved his practice to New York City. He complimented his practice with research and soon gained attention for his scholarship. As a member of the Society of the State of New York, he issued a report in 1845 as chairman of the Committee on Correspondence relative to Medical Education and Examination that led to the organization of the American Medical Association. In 1849, he accepted the chair of physiology and pathology at Rush Medical College in Chicago. When he was opposed in his efforts to reform educational standards there, he founded the Chicago Medical College, of which he was for more than forty years the dean and professor of principles and practice of medicine. In 1855 he became editor of the Chicago Medical Journal, and five years later the Chicago Medical Examiner, remaining with these journals for twenty years. In the mid-1860s, he served two terms as president of the AMA. It was chiefly through his efforts that the AMA launched the Journal of the American Medical Association in 1883. He was its first editor and continued in that position for five years. Each issue of the Journal contained reports of advances in the field, news of the profession, minutes of meetings and transcripts of addresses, book reviews, editorials, and letters. Few men did more than Davis in wresting the field of medicine from the quacks of the 19th century and transforming it into the highly respected profession it is today. $500

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Journal of Applied Microscopy Bausch Lomb Optical Magazine 1898 Vol. 1
This is Vol. 1 of The Journal of Applied Microscopy containing No. 1 (January 1898) to No. 12 (December 1898) comprising 12 issues in all, the complete first year, bound in the publisher’s black cloth. Octavo. Binding VG+. Contents near fine. The Journal of Applied Microscopy was a short-lived monthly (ceased in 1903) published by the venerable firm of Bausch and Lomb. Courtesy Wikipedia, Bausch & Lomb was founded in 1853 by John Jacob Bausch and Henry C. Lomb in Rochester, New York. A trained optician, Bausch found in Lomb the financier and partner he needed for a small but ambitious workshop producing monocles. In 1861, the company began manufacturing Vulcanite rubber eyeglass frames and other precision vision products. During the American Civil War, the Union blockade caused the price of gold and European horn to rise dramatically. This resulted in a growing demand for Bausch & Lomb spectacles made from Vulcanite. In 1876, the company began manufacturing microscopes. Later that year, the Bausch & Lomb Optical Company won a distinction at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition. The company also produced photographic lenses (1883), spectacle lenses (1889), microtomes (1890), and binoculars and telescopes (1893). Starting in 1892, in cooperation with Zeiss in Germany, the company produced optical lenses. In this manner, at the end of the 19th century, the product range included eyeglasses, microscopes and binoculars, projectors, camera lenses and camera diaphragms. The Journal was a scholarly magazine, intended to advance the science of microscopy. Its editor L. B. Elliott, explained in the first issue, that the Journal “will be a progressive record of … the uses of the microscope, improvements in apparatus and new applications of apparatus already existing, methods of working, new and useful formulae, … and news and notes about institutions and men here and abroad.” This is a seminal publication in the field. $150

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Kansas Magazine Walt Whitman Full Year 1872
This is the first year of the Kansas Magazine, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1872) to Vol. 2, No. 6 (December 1872), comprising the first twelve of twenty issues bound in two volumes of leather and cloth. Octavos. Binding edges worn, leather scuffed, generally VG. Contents near fine. Topeka, Kansas, binder’s ticket on front paste-down of each volume. The Kansas Magazine was a respectable though short-lived attempt at a general interest monthly on the frontier. Highlights include articles on Kansas Railroads; Native Americans, including profiles of specific tribes, folklore, descriptions of Indian war dances, and a three part series on western Indian missions; Civil War reminiscences; western fiction; and miscellaneous articles on Darwinism, the death penalty, Walt Whitman in Europe; and a profile of Artemus Ward, obviously written by someone who knew him personally. The literary significance of this volume is that it contains two Walt Whitman first appearance: the poems “The Mystic Trumpeter”(February 1872) and “Virginia — The West” (March 1872). Scarce. $300

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Little Corporal Chicago Children’s Magazine 4 1/2 Year Run 1870-75
This is a run of four and a half years of the Little Corporal, from August 1870 through January 1875, bound in four paperback volumes. Octavos. Bindings functional, homemade. Contents VG, with minor spots and stains. Well illustrated. This run encompasses nearly all of the issues of the Little Corporal when it was an octavo. $100

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The Manhattan New York Monthly Magazine Complete Run Bound 1883-84
This is a complete run of The Manhattan, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1883) to Vol. 4, No. 3 (September 1884), comprising a total of twenty-one issues, twelve of which are bound in two volumes of black leather and cloth and nine of which are in original wrappers. Octavos. Bound issues: VG+ bindings with near fine contents. Title pages bound in. Index to volume 2 bound in. Wrappered issues: VG+ wrappers with near fine contents. Darkening to most spines. The Manhattan was begun by the venerable New York printer John Orr as an umbrella literary organ for fraternal societies — the Odd Fellows, the Knights of Pythias, the Knights of Honor, the Royal Arcanum, and others — and the first issue devoted two dozen pages to them. However, when the societies did not respond with the enthusiasm that Orr had hoped for their place in the contents shrunk and by the fifth issue was abandoned entirely. From then on The Manhattan was a general interest monthly in the mold of its fat and prosperous competitor, The Century. It published high quality period fiction and poetry and had a very respectable critical department. Highlights from these issues include “Artemus Ward in New Orleans,” “The Noble Red Man in Brazil,” travelogues of the St. Johns and Hackensack rivers, a serialized novel by Julian Hawthorne, an article by Cornelius Mathews chastising Charles Dickens as a shameless self-promoter, an article on Western Scenery illustrated by Thomas Moran, and more. The issues grew in size through the run and the magazine appeared to be prospering. But that was not the case. The competition was simply too great. The Manhattan ceased publishing with the September 1884 issue. $400

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Maryland Historical Magazine Bound Run 1906-07
This is a two-year run of the Maryland Historical Magazine from Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 1906) to Vol. 2, No. 4 (December 1907), comprising the first eight issues, bound in two volumes of contemporary red cloth. Octavos. Bindings near fine, contents near fine. The Maryland Historical Society has published the Maryland Historical Magazine continuously for more than 110 years. The first two volumes are representative of the magazines aims and aspirations, They contain articles profiling famous people (various Calverts, William Clairborne), important families (Brooke, Tilden, Lowndes), moments in military history (the battle of Bladensburg, the Sharpsburg campaign), general history (early missions among the Indians, transported convict labor in colonial Maryland) personal history (Reminiscences of Baltimore in 1824), streuctural history (A Bohemia Manor, the stained glass in the Annapolis state house), important documents and letters, and more. A nice set filled with valuable regional history. $100

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Miss Leslie’s Fashion Magazine Die-Cut Lithotint Duval 1843
This is a bound run of Miss Leslie’s Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 1843) to Vol. 2, No. 6 (December 1843), comprising 12 issues in all, a complete run, bound in decorated full red leather. Binding very good, with light rubbing and general wear. Contents very good, clean. This volume contains three “firsts” in American magazine illustration. The frontispiece to the first issue is the first American overlay, that is two fashion plates, the first of which is die-cut so that the face of the woman on the second plate shows through. Ingeniously, it features her in outdoor dress and indoor dress. (The innovation is repeated with the fashion plate in the May issue.) Preceding page 113 is the first American lithotint (by P. S. Duval), entitled “Grandpapa’s Pet,” accompanied by an explanatory article. The December issue closes with the first American fashion plate printed in color (also by Duval), as opposed to hand-colored, as all of the prior ones were and most that came after for decades were. The volume also contains an assortment of hand-colored fashion plates, several embossed plates, and more than a dozen distinctive engravings. This is a curious and important volume in the evolution of magazine printing arts. $200

newrepublic1914-15The New Republic Liberal Political Magazine Vols. 1-2, No. 1 1914-15
This is a bound set of The New Republic containing Vol. 1, No. 1 (November 9, 1914) to Vol. 2, No. 26 (May 1, 1915), comprising the first 26 issues, a complete half year, bound in two volumes of the publisher’s black cloth. Bindings VG+, with a repair to the lower spine of volume 2. Contents near fine, with all covers and advertisements bound in. The New Republic was surely the leading exponent of progressive thought for much of the 20th century. Justice Felix Frankfurter asserted that TR’s “New Nationalism” and Wilson’s “New Freedom” were derived from the ideas of the magazine’s founding editor, Herbert Croly. In its early years it was regarded as the semi-official organ of the Wilson White House. Mott reports that stock market operators, in order to divine White House sentiment, would rush to the newsstands to get early copies. Since those heady days, it has maintained a fairly consistent liberal tack, as least until recently. As Mott says, The New Republic ranks as one of the most influential magazines in the intellectual history of the 20th century. $200

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Northern Monthly Civil War Magazine Portland, ME Editor’s Copy Bound 1864
This is a complete run of the Northern Monthly, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (March 1864) to No. 10 (December 1864), bound in the publisher’s cloth. Octavo. Binding good, with general wear and fading. Contents near fine with occasional light foxing. This was the editor’s copy and bears his library bookplate on the front pastedown. The Northern Monthly was an ambitious effort on the part of Edward P. Weston, superintendent of the Maine Public Schools, to create a magazine of letters in wartime. Unlike the leading monthlies of the period, Harper’s and The Atlantic, The Northern Monthly was dominated by war news, as its subtitle “Literature, Civil and Military Affairs” would lead one to conclude. Interesting content included “Jennie Wade the Heroine of Gettysburg,” “Six Weeks with the Soldiers,” a profile of Maine’s own General O. O. Howard, Neal Dow’s three-part series on the South, extensive reports from the front by various Maine brigades and military officers, the editor’s regular column on the progress of the war, and news of military appointments and promotions. Non-military content included profiles of Maine painters Charles Codman and John Rollin Tilton, the two-part “A Tramp in the Shadow of Katahdin,” an essay on the theater in Portland, and miscellaneous fiction and poetry. An important Maine artifact and a valuable Civil War periodical. $200

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Putnam’s Monthly Complete Run 1906-1910 Henry James Don Marquis Gelett Burgess
This is a complete seven-volume run of Putnam’s Monthly, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (October 1906) to Vol. 7, No. 7 (April 1910), comprising 43 issues bound in brown cloth with leather spine labels. Octavos. Bindings VG; contents VG, with an occasional library stamp. This third attempt by the publishing house of Putnam to establish an organ was built on the ashes of the highly esteemed Critic (1881-1906), which the Putnams had owned since 1898. As such, Putnam’s Monthly was much concerned about literature, but also broader — a general interest monthly in the spirit of Scribner’s Magazine or The Century. It was edited by the sister and brother team of Jeanette and Joseph Gilder, the erudite team that had guided the Critic. They attracted many talents to the pages of the Monthly: Henry James, Maurice Maeterlinck, Count Zeppellin, Brander Matthews, Don Marquis, Carolyn Wells, Everett Shinn, and Gelett Burgess, among many. The magazine is especially valuable for its well-illustrated profiles of writers and artists, both contemporary and from the past. Unlike Putnam’s predecessors, this series met with success, achieving a circulation of 120,000. But it was so expensive to produce that 120,000 subscribers wasn’t enough. The house of Putnam’s never again attempted a magazine. $300

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Seven Arts Literature Politics Little Magazine Complete Run 1916-17
This is a complete run of The Seven Arts, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (November 1916) to Vol. 2, No. 6 (October 1917), comprising 12 issues, bound in two volumes of green cloth. Octavos. Bindings VG, contents VG. Covers and ads not bound in, as was the standard practice of the time period. The Seven Arts was one of the most exciting of the early little magazines. Edited by James Oppenheim, Waldo Frank, and Van Wyck Brooks, The Seven Arts proclaimed in its prospectus: “We have no tradition to continue; we have no school of style to build up. What we ask of the writer is simply self-expression without regard to current magazine standards. [However, we do not intend] The Seven Arts [to be] a magazine for artists, but an expression of artists for the community.” The results of this appeal were astounding. The magazine ended up lasting only a year, but in that time it published one literary highlight after another: Eugene O’Neill’s first short story, “Tomorrow;” Robert Frost’s only play, “A Way Out;” Theodore Dreiser’s sweeping article, “Art, Life, and America;” H. L. Mencken’s brilliant defense of Dreiser; John Dos Passos’ first published work on the artistic stirrings in Spain; Bertrand Russell’s hopeful speculation on the near-death of nationalism; short stories by D. H. Lawrence and Sherwood Anderson; poetry by Robert Frost, Carl Sandburg, and Amy Lowell; criticism by Paul Rosenfeld, Marsden Hartley, and Randolph Bourne, and on and on. Politics was also part of the editorial mix and, alas, it was on the hard rocks of politics that the magazine foundered. The thundering pacifism of Oppenheim and contributors Bourne and John Reed so offended the wealthy patron of the magazine, Mrs. Rankine, that she withdrew her support. The editors appealed to subscribers and friends to save The Seven Arts, but it was not to be. Hoffman said of it, “Few magazines can equal, through their entire lives, the vitality or significance of this short-lived magazine.” $400

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Somerset County New Jersey Historical Quarterly Magazine Bound 1912-13
This is the first two years (eight quarterly issues) of the Somerset County Historical Quarterly for 1912 and 1913, bound in leather and cloth-covered boards. Octavo. Binding VG, scuffed, crack to spine. Contents near fine. Illustrated. Indexed. $100

southernreview1828-29The Southern Review Charleston SC Literary Magazine 1828-29
This is the first two years of The Southern Review, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (February 1828) to [Vol. 4] No. 8 (November 1829), comprising eight issues in original wrappers. Octavos. Wrappers lightly soiled, with small chips and losses, generally in remarkably good shape; contents VG. The Southern Review scorned the popular. In its prospectus it stated: “It shall be among our first objects to …arrest, if possible, the current which has been directed so steadily against our country generally, and the South in particular; and to offer to our fellow citizens one Journal which they may read without finding themselves the objects of perpetual sarcasm, or of affected commiseration.” The quarterly was unapologetically scholarly in tone and scope, focusing on subjects such as Roman literature and Cuvier’s theory of the globe, reviewing European tomes in the languages in which they were written, and discussing topics of current interest such as the Bank of the United States in a studiously dispassionate tone. One historian of the magazine said it was “the most perfect example America afforded of…scholarly contempt for popular demand.” The first two years were edited by Charleston banker Stephen Elliott, who died in 1830. The quarterly ultimately passed into the hands of Hugh Legare, the erudite Charleston lawyer and politician. It folded in 1832. The Review was the South’s first attempt at a weighty quarterly. That it lasted as long as it did is cause for surprise and not a little admiration for the original subscribers who waded through each daunting issue. $300

oldfiresidestoriesHarriet Beecher Stowe/Atlantic Monthly Old Fireside Stories 1870
This is a complete serialization of Harriet Beecher Stowe’s “Old Fireside Stories” in Atlantic Monthly, June through August, October through December 1870. Octavos. Original wrappers. Near Fine. Complete in six parts. Six Stowe short stories, which were collected into book form in 1871. A beautiful set. $175

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Sunset Pacific Monthly Magazine 1906-07 Maynard Dixon Ed Borein
This is a complete six-month volume of Sunset Magazine, from Vol. 18, No. 1 (November 1906) to No. 6 (April 1907), comprising six issues, bound in green cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with some mottling to cloth. Contents near fine, with a library stamp to the cover of the November issue. Enhanced considerably by the rare presence of all covers and advertisements bound in. Index bound in. Highlights include two color covers by Maynard Dixon, a meditation (“The Singing of the West”) written and illustrated by Dixon, a frontispieces by Dixon, and a frontispiece by Ed. Borein. Begun in 1898 as a promotional monthly for the wonders of the Southwest by the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset quickly grew into a well illustrated general interest monthly, far surpassing the modest vision of its projectors. David Starr Jordan, John Muir, and Charles Warren Stoddard led the list of non-fiction contributors, who wrote on a wide variety of subjects, from world affairs to California history. Though fiction and poetry had its place in Sunset from the start, they took up more space and greater luster beginning with the editorship of Charles Sedgwick Aiken (1901-10). Contributors included Jack London, Owen Wister, Mary Austin, Stewart Edward White, Gelett Burgess, Bret Harte, Sinclair Lewis, and others. The magazine absorbed Pacific Monthly in 1912, cementing its status as the leading monthly of the west coast. In 1914, long after it had transcended its initial purpose as a barker for the attractions of the southwest, the Southern Pacific sold the magazine to its editors. The early covers were photographic. Under Aiken, they became more colorful, depicting scenes from the Southwest, old and new. At the end of 1928, on the verge of bankruptcy, Sunset was sold to the Lane family, who transformed it from a general interest magazine into “the magazine of southern living,” in which form it prospers today. $200

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Sunset Pacific Monthly Magazine 1907-08 Jack London Ed Borein Mary Austin
This is a complete six-month volume of Sunset Magazine, from Vol. 20, No. 1 (November 1907) to No. 6 (April 1908), comprising six issues, bound in green cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with some mottling to cloth. Contents near fine, some wear to covers. A library stamp to the cover of the November issue. Enhanced considerably by the rare presence of all covers and advertisements bound in. Highlights include a short story (“That Spot”) by Jack London, a beautiful color cover by Ed. Borein, a frontispiece by Borein, an essay (“Some Literary Myths”) by Mary Austin, a poem (“Pabalita Sandoval”) by Damon Runyon, several poems by George Sterling, and a panoramic fold-out view of the new San Francisco by H. C. Tibbitts. Begun in 1898 as a promotional monthly for the wonders of the Southwest by the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset quickly grew into a well illustrated general interest monthly, far surpassing the modest vision of its projectors. David Starr Jordan, John Muir, and Charles Warren Stoddard led the list of non-fiction contributors, who wrote on a wide variety of subjects, from world affairs to California history. Though fiction and poetry had its place in Sunset from the start, they took up more space and greater luster beginning with the editorship of Charles Sedgwick Aiken (1901-10). Contributors included Jack London, Owen Wister, Mary Austin, Stewart Edward White, Gelett Burgess, Bret Harte, Sinclair Lewis, and others. The magazine absorbed Pacific Monthly in 1912, cementing its status as the leading monthly of the west coast. In 1914, long after it had transcended its initial purpose as a barker for the attractions of the southwest, the Southern Pacific sold the magazine to its editors. The early covers were photographic. Under Aiken, they became more colorful, depicting scenes from the Southwest, old and new. At the end of 1928, on the verge of bankruptcy, Sunset was sold to the Lane family, who transformed it from a general interest magazine into “the magazine of southern living,” in which form it prospers today. $200

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Sunset Pacific Monthly Magazine 1908 Maynard Dixon, Ed Borein, Damon Runyon
This is a complete eight-month volume of Sunset Magazine, from Vol. 21, No. 1 (May 1908) to No. 8 (December 1908), comprising eight issues, bound in green cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with some mottling to cloth. Contents near fine, with a library stamp to the cover of the May issue and embossing stamp to two others. Lacking front fly. Enhanced considerably by the rare presence of all covers and advertisements bound in. Highlights include a color cover by Maynard Dixon (with stamp), a color cover by Ed. Borein (with embossing stamp), eight of ten installments of Owen Wister’s novel “Lin McLean,” a short story (“With Feet of Clay”) by Damon Runyon, and three stories and one poem illustrated by Ed. Borein. Begun in 1898 as a promotional monthly for the wonders of the Southwest by the Southern Pacific Railroad, Sunset quickly grew into a well illustrated general interest monthly, far surpassing the modest vision of its projectors. David Starr Jordan, John Muir, and Charles Warren Stoddard led the list of non-fiction contributors, who wrote on a wide variety of subjects, from world affairs to California history. Though fiction and poetry had its place in Sunset from the start, they took up more space and greater luster beginning with the editorship of Charles Sedgwick Aiken (1901-10). Contributors included Jack London, Owen Wister, Mary Austin, Stewart Edward White, Gelett Burgess, Bret Harte, Sinclair Lewis, and others. The magazine absorbed Pacific Monthly in 1912, cementing its status as the leading monthly of the west coast. In 1914, long after it had transcended its initial purpose as a barker for the attractions of the southwest, the Southern Pacific sold the magazine to its editors. The early covers were photographic. Under Aiken, they became more colorful, depicting scenes from the Southwest, old and new. At the end of 1928, on the verge of bankruptcy, Sunset was sold to the Lane family, who transformed it from a general interest magazine into “the magazine of southern living,” in which form it prospers today. $250

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The Tammany Times Weekly Magazine New York Politics Boss Croker 1893-1900
This is a ten-volume run of the Tammany Times, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 14, 1893) to Vol. 14, No. 26 (May 7, 1900), comprising 260 issues, bound in ten volumes of the publisher’s decorated green cloth. A broken run, consisting of volumes one through six (5/1893-5/96), nine and ten (5/1897-5/98), thirteen and fourteen (5/1899-5/1900). Bindings VG, contents near fine. All covers and advertisements bound in. The Tammany Times was the official organ of the Tammany Hall political machine. It was published weekly from 1893 through 1917. In his salutation, Fred Feigl, the editor, made the rather remarkable claim that “It is an acknowledged fact that Tammany as a political organization is the most perfect in the world.” As such, the grand goal of the publication was to “establish Tammany Societies in all sections of the United States….” Well, the magazine never achieved that, but it did and does provide an engrossing look into the workings of America’s most famous political machine. Attractively laid out and professionally illustrated, it featured the expected: laudatory biographical sketches of leading Democrats, starting off with the President, Grover Cleveland, promotional materials for candidates for office, reports on political news from Washington, Albany, and City Hall; and the unexpected: short stories and columns on sports and the theater. We are not aware of a complete run of this title anywhere. Even scattered volumes are scarce. $1,200

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Transactions Technical Society Pacific Coast Magazine San Francisco 1884-85
This is the first two volumes (March-May 1884 to October-December 1885) of the Transactions of the Technical Society of the Pacific Coast. Octavo. Bound in red buckram. Library of Congress duplicate. Originally owned by San Francisco civil engineer Otto von Geldern. Contents VG, covers bound in. Issue numbering is confusing but all pages are present. Well illustrated with foldout diagrams of West Coast engineering projects. $200

waresvalleymo1875Ware’s Valley Monthly St. Louis Magazine Bound Volume 1 1875
This is Ware’s Valley Monthly Vol. 1, No. 1 (May 1875) to No. 6 (October 1875), comprising the first six issues, bound in leather and cloth. Octavo. Binding VG, with edge wear. Contents near fine, with occasional light smudging. Ware’s Valley Monthly, “A Journal of Western Thought and Life,” was an ambitious attempt at a general interest monthly for the West. As such, it featured serialized fiction, poetry, editorial comment from a Western perspective, and other miscellany. It also devoted space to boosterism (“Summer Resorts in the West” , a two-part “Colorado: Its Attractions”, and “The Southwest and its Metropolis.”; American Indians (“The Comanches – An Ethnological Sketch”); and Civil War-related articles (a long review of Sherman’s memoirs, followed by another exploring Sherman’s attitudes about the laws of war, and a reminiscence of General Sterling Price). But publishing in 19th century America beyond the safe confines of the East Coast was always a risk and Ware’s Valley Monthly, despite a bright start, lasted only eighteen issues. $150

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Western Monthly Chicago Pre-Fire Magazine 1869 Bound Vol. 1
This is a bound volume of the first six issues (January through June) of The Western Monthly, an ambitious Chicago general interest magazine published for only two years (1869-1870). Octavo. 20th century leather and marbled board binding, near fine. Frontispiece and index bound in. Contents VG, with browning to the upper margin at the beginning and end of the volume. Five (of six) steel-engraved portraits. Highlights include articles on the Nevada silver mines, the Arizona territory, Utah, and southern California. $100

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The World We Live In / The Literary Museum Semi-Monthly Magazine 1844-45
This is the first two years of The World We Live In / The Literary Museum, from Vol. 1, No. 1 (January 6, 1844) to Vol. 2, No. 24 (December [15] 1845), comprising 48 semi-monthly issues, bound in contemporary leather and cloth boards. Binding fair, well-worn, front hinge cracked but still sound. Contents VG, first and last two issues stained. Other issues have occasional browning or small tears. Title pages and indexes bound into the rear of each volume. John Hall, erstwhile editor and publisher of the Boston Weekly Magazine (1838-1841), established The World We Live In with new partner Andrew loud in response, they claimed, to requests by old subscribers to launch a similar effort. And that it was: light literature and poetry, both original and selected, news squibs, sheet music, etc., a typical literary and parlor magazine of the period. Highlights include articles on portrait painting among Indians, James Harper’s election to the post of mayor of New York Hall, Andrew Jackson’s funeral, and several pieces on Texas and the Sandwich Islands. The first volume contains two steel engravings, one of Boston Common (foxed) and one of a city street scene from the 1600s. The second volume contains four, including one depicting the cultivation of tea and the other a scene from the play “Paul Pry.” Hall, the sole proprietor by 1845, rechristened the magazine The Literary Museum in April of that year, adding the long and grandiose sub-title: “A Repository of the Useful and Entertaining including the Wonders of Nature and Art, Tales of all Countries and all Ages, Travels, Adventures, Biography, etc.” though the eclectic contents remained the same. Hall continued to publish the Museum until October of 1847. $125